Where your students can find last-minute summer internships

May 25, 2011 at 4:43 pm | Posted in Finding internships | Leave a comment
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Susan Sandberg

Career Centers nationwide are experiencing increased demand for summer internships from undergraduate and graduate students as well as new graduates who don’t have jobs and want internships as stepping stones. Here are some suggestions for your students on finding last-minute summer internships:

  • Internships.com The site lists 41,400 internships from nearly 20,000 companies available worldwide. Students can benefit from Internship Seeker 2.0, an iPhone app that provides mobile access to thousands of available internship listings on internships.com. Your students can download this FREE app to search internships while on the go. They can search by keyword or location, view detailed descriptions or share listings. New features include the ability to save and manage searches, bookmarks and a student’s internships.com account.
  • LinkedIn:  Students can use their LinkedIn connections to help shorten the search process and quickly obtain summer internships. Once your students find an internship program that interests them, they can do a “people search” and check if a hiring manager or HR staff members of that company are on LinkedIn. The goal is to have a mutual connection with the “insider” of the company, so students can even ask him/her for an introduction to the intern manager rather than having to do the often frustrating and fruitless “cold calling.”
  • Internship Mini-Fair:  If you have time (or have interns working in your office), you may want to hold an informal Internship Mini-Fair for students who have not gotten a summer internship and still want one. You’ll earn points with your students for your efforts and impress potential internship managers, too. Invite local businesses or campus departments to attend, reassuring them that you’ll help them develop an internship program if they don’t have one.
  • Local business or government groups:  The Commonwealth Marketing Office, a Massachusetts state agency, recently launched a website designed to advance the state’s effort to keep college students in Massachusetts after graduation from local colleges. The Mass Stay Here Internship Site is a statewide internship resource highlighting internship opportunities. The Mass Technology Leadership Council and the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce are also creating internship sites on the same platform for their member companies, so internships posted to the MassTLC and Boston Chamber sites will appear on the Mass Stay Here Internships site.
  • On campus:  The Daily Princetonian recently reported how student government organizations can support internships.  The USG approved $6,300 for a summer technology intern to work on USG-related projects, including a mobile calendar application and an improved meal exchange site. The summer intern will also work on projects such as improving the DVD rental system and the USG election registration site. The $6,300 will cover summer housing and a $17 hourly salary for the USG intern. Both the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Students and the Office of the Vice President for Campus Life at Princeton sponsor summer internships, too.

How Can Students Stand Out Among Internship Applicants?

May 11, 2011 at 11:35 am | Posted in Finding internships, Intern Advice | Leave a comment
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Joyce Domijan

Often when students create their first resume to apply for their initial internship, their background and experience are lacking due to their youth, and they struggle to find appropriate information to include. I’m sure that you’ve reviewed a few anemic resumes in your years in career services. How can students with little business experience create resumes that will entice employers to call them for an interview?

Employers don’t expect interns to have lots of business experience, so what do they look for in a resume that will differentiate applicants?  Employers want to see indications of prized qualities such as:

  • Creativity
  • Hard work
  • Motivation
  • Dedication
  • Leadership
  • Loyalty

But with little business experience, how can students illustrate these qualities? Students need to think outside the box to unearth examples from their life experience, school experience, extracurricular activities, volunteer efforts and any other area where they can illustrate that they exhibit these qualities.  A few examples might include:

  • Ask a teacher/professor/instructor from a ‘favorite course’ where the student excelled, to write a recommendation and include a bullet under coursework quoting the instructor’s praise.
  • Student’s with a background in athletics, music, or other ‘practiced arts’ should include bullets, describing their workout or practice regimens; their years of dedication; their achievements within their craft; etc. These illustrate their motivation and dedication. Also, include any awards they may have earned (e.g. qualified for state tournament; played first violin; etc.).
  • Most young people are involved in some type of volunteer experiences. Always include these types of activities on the resume. They show a concern and empathy for others and a dedication to their community.
  • A student, who has encountered adversity and overcome it, has built character. This is another area where a student should include examples. If you helped to raise siblings or contributed to the household through odd jobs, it speaks volumes about your character.

Remember – resume content, especially in the early years, should contain information that speaks to the student’s accomplishments, regardless of where they occur. In the end, students need to be creative with their resumes and find ways through their life experience to differentiate themselves from the pack!

Guiding your students to fastest growing jobs

May 6, 2011 at 10:26 am | Posted in Job market | 1 Comment
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Susan Sandberg

CNNMoney reports a pickup of 216,000 jobs in March. The unemployment rate dropped to 8.8%, an entire percentage point lower than it was four months ago. Your students may want to know what are the hottest job growth areas, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics:

Top 10 Fastest Growing Jobs with Bachelor’s Degree

1. Biomedical EngineersBiomedical engineers design, develop and evaluate devices, for example artificial organs, prostheses and instrumentation, and procedures, such as medical information systems and health management and care delivery systems.

2. Network Systems and Data Communications AnalystsNetwork systems and data communications analysts design and evaluate network systems, for example, local area networks (LANs), Wide Area Networks (WANs), and Internet systems.

3. Financial ExaminersFinancial examiners ensure that banks and financial institutions comply with the laws and regulations that govern them. They also make certain financial and real estate transactions are in compliance with laws and regulations.

4. Athletic TrainersAthletic trainers treat injured athletes and other individuals. They also teach people how to prevent injuries. Employment of athletic trainers is projected to grow by 37% through 2018.

5. Computer Applications Software EngineersComputer applications software engineers use different programming languages to design, construct and maintain software and specialized utility programs. They analyze users’ needs in order to do this.

6. Environmental EngineersEnvironmental engineers use engineering principles to solve environmental problems such as pollution. Employment of environmental engineers is projected to grow by 31% through 2018.

7. Computer Systems Software EngineersComputer systems software engineers build and maintain companies’ computer systems and plan their future growth. We can expect to see a 30% increase in the employment in this field through 2018.

8. Survey ResearchersSurvey researchers design or conduct surveys about people and their opinions. Employment in this field is expected to increase by 30% through 2018.

9. Personal Financial AdvisorsPersonal financial advisors help people make investment decisions. There is expected to be a 30% increase in employment in this field through 2018.

10. Market Research AnalystsMarket research analysts conduct research and analyze data in order to help companies determine what products and services to sell, how much to charge for them and where and how to sell them.

 

Top 10 Fastest Growing Jobs with Post-Secondary Training or Associate’s Degree

1. Skin Care SpecialistsSkin care specialists treat their clients’ skin by giving facials, full body treatments and head and neck massages.

2. Dental HygienistsDental hygienists provide preventative dental care and teach patients how to maintain good oral health.

3. Veterinary Technologists and TechniciansVeterinary technologists and technicians assist veterinarians by conducting clinical and laboratory procedures in private clinics and animal hospitals.

4. Physical Therapist AssistantsPhysical therapist assistants (PTAs) perform a variety of tasks under the direction and supervision of physical therapists. These tasks include helping patients perform exercises, giving massages and administering electric stimulation.

5. Environmental Engineering TechniciansEnvironmental engineering technicians assist environmental engineers in solving environmental problems, including pollution.

6. Occupational Therapist AssistantsOccupational therapist assistants help clients with activities and exercises specified in a treatment plan developed with occupational therapists.

7. Fitness Trainers and Aerobics InstructorsFitness trainers lead, motivate and instruct people in exercise activities. There is expected to be a 29% increase in the employment of fitness trainers through 2018.

8. Environmental Science and Protection TechniciansEnvironmental science and protection technicians, working under the direction of environmental scientists, monitor the environment and investigate sources of pollution by performing laboratory and field tests.

9. Heating, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Mechanics and InstallersHeating, air conditioning and refrigeration mechanics and installers, commonly called HVAC technicians, install, maintain and repair heating, air conditioning and refrigeration systems.

10. Paralegals and Legal AssistantsParalegals, sometimes called legal assistants, help lawyers with a variety of tasks, including preparing for trials, hearings and closings, doing research, and drafting legal documents.

Getting help with finding internships for your students

May 3, 2011 at 11:35 am | Posted in career center | Leave a comment
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Susan Sandberg

You probably have a long line of students at your door, all wanting summer internships. Spring is usually the busiest time of the year for overworked career services professionals who wish they had lots of interns to help them. However, take heart. You do have resources available to you. Check out the following:

  • College committees:  Faculty members inElonCollege, theCollege ofArts and Sciences, have formed a committee that will temporarily serve as a means of discussion for internships within the college. The newly formed committee is looking at broad questions regarding internships, according to Pam Kiser, the committee chair and professor of human service studies. Kiser said members of the committee have been discussing pertinent questions, such as the best practices for academic internships, the hallmarks of high quality internships, what a syllabus for an internship looks like, what kind of training and faculty development for mentoring internships and what types of compensation are appropriate for faculty.  Could you organize such a committee at your college to help you?
  • Online databases:  According to a recent article in the San Francisco Chronicle, the days of finding summer internship opportunities through the school career counselor are in the past. “The competition to land internships is fierce. This requires new strategies, and at times, gutsy moves.” Although this article may be exaggerating the diminishing role of the school career counselor, students do have a large array of Web sites, where they can take responsibility for finding themselves the best internships. If your students do their research on Internships.com, you can track and review their activity records through monthly reports, ensuring that your students are active participants in the internship process.
  • Internships.com Affiliate University status:  If you register to be an Affiliate, you can post internships exclusively to students at your university, receive custom analytics and statistics about your students, have access to a dedicated client care team, and get reports on industry trends and data. You can also put your own career center’s logo and colors on materials for a customized appearance. As an Affiliate, you can receive and send monthly e-newsletters to students about the internships industry, opportunities, and resume/career tips. Also, your school will receive a press release detailing the positive aspects of the new partnership. Another option is to register as a Basic member. For details, click on New Services for your CareerCenter on the Web site.
  • Partnerships:  The weak economy has left all government agencies from municipal to federal without any option but to cut the number of workers or put a freeze on hiring. Formerly an excellent resource for paid summer internships, these agencies may now be a good place to develop a partnership for unpaid summer internships for students. The experience could be invaluable in gaining future internships and networking. If students apply to a government-related agency in their home towns, living at home might offset the unpaid aspect. As a career services professional, you have the credentials to build such partnerships that can benefit your students. A struggling agency may welcome your student interns in a win-win situation for everyone.

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